Jacob
 
 
 
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  • First question
    December 17, 2013
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    December 17, 2013
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    December 26, 2013
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    December 26, 2013
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Jacob's Questions
 

Pressure

If a airwatts are 0.117354 * (CFM) * (inches water), then do I calculate correctly that this model no. WD1851 will lift water 12.8 inches high?

306 watts * (1/0.117354) * (1/203 CFM) = 12.8 inches of water

I feel like that number is way too low - I'm sure your product lifts water more than 1 foot high! I may have the calculation wrong or the pressure may be specified another way. What do the units of "G/h" mean?

Besides, it seems like an odd coincidence that this is almost exactly the inches for model WD4070 when the WD4070 is rated 5.0 peak HP and the model on this page is rated 6.5 peak HP.

Thank you for the help.
4 months ago
Customer avatar
by
Jacob
Indiana, USA
 

Pressure

If a airwatts are 0.117354 * (CFM) * (inches water), then do I calculate correctly that this model no. WD4070 will lift water 12.9 inches high?

167 watts * (1/0.117354) * (1/110 CFM) = 12.9 inches water

I feel like that number is way too low - I'm sure your product lifts water more than 1 foot high! I may have the calculation wrong or the pressure may be specified another way. What do the units of "G/h" mean?

Thank you for the help.
4 months ago
Customer avatar
by
Jacob
Indiana, USA
 
Jacob's Answers
 

Pressure

If a airwatts are 0.117354 * (CFM) * (inches water), then do I calculate correctly that this model no. WD1851 will lift water 12.8 inches high?

306 watts * (1/0.117354) * (1/203 CFM) = 12.8 inches of water

I feel like that number is way too low - I'm sure your product lifts water more than 1 foot high! I may have the calculation wrong or the pressure may be specified another way. What do the units of "G/h" mean?

Besides, it seems like an odd coincidence that this is almost exactly the inches for model WD4070 when the WD4070 is rated 5.0 peak HP and the model on this page is rated 6.5 peak HP.

Thank you for the help.
Thank you, RIDGID! That really helped me understand how the pressure and CFM are related, and the calculation result of 12.8 inches makes sense now. I didn't realize the airwatts equation was NOT referring to "sealed" inches of water. Now I see why using sealed inches for calculating airwatts wouldn't make any sense.

You mentioned 49 inches a couple times. Is that the sealed lift this vacuum is rated for? If not, would you please share the max water lift rating?

Thank you again.
3 months, 3 weeks ago
Customer avatar
by
Jacob
Indiana, USA